KCGI(3) Library Functions Manual KCGI(3)

NAME

kcgiminimal CGI and FastCGI library in C

LIBRARY

library “libkcgi”

DESCRIPTION

The kcgi library handles the CGI or FastCGI environment for C web applications. Interfacing applications generally work as follows:
  1. Call khttp_parse(3) as early as possible. This will parse and validate input fields and cookies with the kvalid_string(3) family of functions or those provided by the calling application. It will do so in memory, so enormous requests (e.g., files) will occur entirely in memory! It also sets up the HTTP environment: compression, paths, MIME types, and so on.
  2. Process input fields by examining the struct kpair elements.
  3. Emit HTTP headers with khttp_head(3), followed by khttp_body(3) to begin the HTTP body.
  4. Emit HTTP body output using the khttp_template(3) templating system, the khttp_write(3) family for general HTTP content, and/or an external library such as kcgihtml(3). Do not use printf(3) or other functions to append to standard output: kcgi will automatically compress output if requested by the client, and overriding the output stream will circumvent this behaviour and might mix compressed and uncompressed data.
  5. Call khttp_free(3) to clean up.
It can also accept FastCGI connections in a manner similar to the above, except that the parse routine is run within a loop.
  1. Call khttp_fcgi_init(3) as early as possible.
  2. Iterate over khttp_fcgi_parse(3) for as many connections as desired, performing any processing on the created request. Each parse must be matched with khttp_free(3).
  3. Call khttp_fcgi_free(3) when all processing is complete.
To compile applications with kcgi, include the kcgi.h as follows:
#include <stdarg.h> /* va_list */ 
#include <stdint.h> /* int64_t */ 
#include <unistd.h> /* ssize_t */ 
#include <kcgi.h>
Then make sure kcgi.h is in the header path and libkcgi.a is in the library path, then link with -lkcgi and -lz (unless compression has been disabled at compile-time). For example,
% cc -I/usr/local/include -c -o sample.o sample.c 
% cc -L/usr/local/lib -o sample sample.o -lkcgi -lz
If the library will be statically linked (e.g., for running within a chroot(2)), and assuming you'll use the kcgihtml(3) library, link as follows:
% cc -o sample -static sample.o -lkcgihtml -lkcgi -lz

EXAMPLES

The following simple example assumes that kcgi.h is in the compiler's include path. It does nothing but emit “Hello, world!” to the output.
#include <stdarg.h> 
#include <stdint.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <unistd.h> 
#include <kcgi.h> 
 
int main(void) { 
  struct kreq r; 
  const char *page = "index"; 
 
  if (KCGI_OK != khttp_parse(&r, NULL, 0, &page, 1, 0)) 
      return(EXIT_FAILURE); 
 
  khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_STATUS], 
      "%s", khttps[KHTTP_200]); 
  khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_CONTENT_TYPE], 
      "%s", kmimetypes[r.mime]); 
  khttp_body(&r); 
  khttp_puts(&r, "Hello, world!"); 
 
  khttp_free(&r); 
  return(EXIT_SUCCESS); 
}
This can be extended to work with the FastCGI interface by allowing the request parser to operate within a loop.
#include <stdarg.h> 
#include <stdint.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <unistd.h> 
#include <kcgi.h> 
 
int main(void) { 
  struct kreq r; 
  struct kfcgi *fcgi; 
  const char *page = "index"; 
 
  if (KCGI_OK != khttp_fcgi_init(&fcgi, NULL, 0, &page, 1, 0)) 
      return(EXIT_FAILURE); 
 
  while (KCGI_OK == khttp_fcgi_parse(fcgi, &req)) { 
    khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_STATUS], 
        "%s", khttps[KHTTP_200]); 
    khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_CONTENT_TYPE], 
        "%s", kmimetypes[r.mime]); 
    khttp_body(&r); 
    khttp_puts(&r, "Hello, world!"); 
    khttp_free(&r); 
  } 
 
  khttp_fcgi_free(fcgi); 
  return(EXIT_SUCCESS); 
}
In a more complicated example, kcgi accepts a single parameter “string” to validate and display. This might be provided as part of an HTML form or directly as part of the URL query string.
#include <stdarg.h> 
#include <stdint.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <unistd.h> 
#include <kcgi.h> 
 
int main(void) { 
  struct kreq r; 
  struct kpair *p; 
  const char *page = "index"; 
  struct kvalid key = { kvalid_stringne, "string" }; 
 
  if (KCGI_OK != khttp_parse(&r, &key, 1, &page, 1, 0)) 
      return(EXIT_FAILURE); 
 
  khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_STATUS], 
      "%s", khttps[KHTTP_200]); 
  khttp_head(&r, kresps[KRESP_CONTENT_TYPE], 
      "%s", kmimetypes[r.mime]); 
  khttp_body(&r); 
  khttp_puts(&r, "Result: "); 
  if ((p = r.fieldmap[0])) 
      khttp_puts(&r, p->parsed.s); 
  else if (r.fieldnmap[0]) 
      khttp_puts(&r, "bad parse"); 
  else 
      khttp_puts(&r, "no value"); 
 
  khttp_free(&r); 
  return(EXIT_SUCCESS); 
}
Applications will usually specify an array of key-value pairs to validate; or in the event of web services, a default validator (empty string) for the full HTTP message body.

SEE ALSO

kcgi(3), kcgihtml(3), kcgijson(3), kcgiregress(3), kcgixml(3), khttp_body(3), khttp_fcgi_free(3), khttp_fcgi_init(3), khttp_fcgi_parse(3), khttp_fcgi_test(3), khttp_free(3), khttp_head(3), khttp_parse(3), khttp_template(3), khttp_write(3), khttpbasic_validate(3), khttpdigest_validate(3), kmalloc(3), kutil_epoch2str(3), kutil_urlencode(3), kvalid_string(3), kfcgi(8)

STANDARDS

Many standards are involved in the kcgi library, most significantly being draft RFC 3875, “The Common Gateway Interface (CGI) Version 1.1”, and the “FastCGI Specification”, version 1.0, published 29 April 1996.
Additional HTTP methods are defined by RFC 4918, “HTTP Extensions for Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning”; and RFC 4791 , “Calendaring Extensions to WebDAV”.

AUTHORS

The kcgi library was written by Kristaps Dzonsons <kristaps@bsd.lv>.
November 25, 2016 OpenBSD 5.8